Metrics Linking KPIs with Business Strategy

In most organizations, the accounting or finance group is responsible for assembling a series of reports after month-end and after the accounting close. The reports are assembled and distributed to senior managers to provide them with a clear understanding of the state of the business. An effective reporting package should include four items: an Income Statement, Variance of Actual to Plan, Production and Financial Forecast for the Balance of the Year, and a Scorecard with Key Performance Indicators (KPIs).

The first three reports in the package present economic and production information, while the last report provides metrics associated with company objectives and department-specific initiatives. As a general rule, the KPIs provide information about the organization’s success from a strategy perspective (i.e. financial, operational, and risk/compliance). The benefits of key performance indicators are that they . . .

  •  Quickly show senior management the measurable progress that has been made toward the achievement of company strategy.
  • Provide a fast way to explain variances in income statements.
  • Make it easy to link departmental contributions to strategy attainment, which aids in performance measurement and management.
  • Allow nonfinancial individuals to understand the organization’s success at achieving goals and strategies by tracking how the KPIs change over time.

Aligning KPIs with Strategy

KPIs should be part of every department’s initiatives and be closely aligned with the company’s annual business plan. When the business plan is produced, supporting strategies must be formulated, vetted, and approved among the senior managers.

At the department level, initiatives must then be developed that foster the attainment of the company’s overall business strategy. In turn, KPIs are established to measure the success of the initiatives.

Common strategies with corresponding key performance indicators include the following:

Strategies, Initiatives, and KPIs

Company Strategy Department Initiative Key Performance Indicator
Increase Employee Satisfaction CompanywideHuman ResourcesHuman Resources % Respondents Satisfied or Extremely Satisfied from Employee SurveysHeadcountEmployee Attrition
Increase Customer Satisfaction Companywide % Respondents Satisfied or Extremely Satisfied from Customer Surveys
Increase Profit Margin Sales Profit/Units Sold
Improve Credit Quality Sales Ensure Client Credit Files contain all executed documents and background checks
Reduce Seriously Delinquent Account Receivables Sales 90 Day + AR/Total AR
Execute Targeted Marketing Campaigns Marketing # of ProgramsReturn on Marketing Investment %
Contain and Control Costs Operations Personnel Expense/Units SoldNon-Personnel Expenses/Units Sold
Improve Vendor Compliance Compliance Vendor CostsVendor adherence to Service Level Agreements (SLA)

The strategies presented here are basic and need to be adjusted based on each organization’s specific business model. Also, if the product or service sold includes multiple steps, it is appropriate to include KPIs for each step; the key performance metrics can take the form of values and/or ratios.

Controllers can play a valuable role in establishing KPIs across the organization and helping management at all levels to ensure that strategies will attain the desired financial results, in support of the company’s business goals (growth and profitability).

To develop a KPI scorecard, take the following steps:

  1.  Identify a dozen or so important activities the team can accomplish that will contribute to the strategic objectives or compliance obligations of the business.
  2. Group the variables in a logical order, such as Production, Operations/fulfillment, Post-purchase Customer Care, Audit, and Compliance.
  3. Set targets and tolerance ranges.
  4. Benchmark against your top competitors and add benchmarks for each KPI on your scorecard. This will help in tracking how you are performing vs. the desired performance level.

Once established, the KPIs can be presented to senior managers during regular financial reporting for their review. The KPI report should always include an explanation of why you fell short of, or exceeded, the targeted KPIs. After a few months you will be able to see how the company is trending.

A Few Caveats

Be careful about creating KPIs that, if maximized, could cause problems in another area. As soon as you place a number on a table and publish it, the responsible individuals will do all they can to improve the value and reach the target that is set.

For example, time to complete a process has a very large impact on customer satisfaction. Intuitively, shortening the time element will have a positive impact on satisfaction, except when quality is reduced. If you are going to track time, you should also track error rates or rework required. If time declines and rework also declines or at least stays the same, then you’re on the right track.

Another issue that can occur is when financial people hide behind the metrics. When asked a question, a person responds with the metric, which is appropriate at first. However, especially with ratios, you must understand the ingredients of the ratio.

For example, if a KPI is “90 Day + AR/Total AR” and if the ratio declined (a good factor), did 90 Day Collections improve (which is what you want) or did Total AR increase (which is what you do not want)? Do not just look to the ratio without understanding the significance of the numerator and denominator that generated the metric. There is no replacement for understanding the numbers cold.

I wrote this post for the Institute of Finance Management “Controller’s Report Member Briefing.”  It was published in the June 2015 edition.

Author: Regis Quirin
Visit Regis's Website - Email Regis
Regis Quirin is a financial executive with 23 years of corporate experience, i.e. New York Stock Exchange, JP Morgan Chase, and GMAC ResCap; and 15 years working with small and medium-sized entities, i.e. joint ventures, start-up entities, established businesses. In 2014, Regis published "Redesign to Turnaround Underperforming Small and Medium-Sized Businesses" available via Amazon.

CFO Concerns 2015

In 2015, the CFO will continue to be tested in a challenging market.  After the Great Recession, growth has not returned to pre-recession levels.  The macro-economic environment is anything but stable.  In addition to individual concerns that are industry or market specific, following is a selection of issues that face all CFO’s regardless of the organization industry, size or geography.

Brand Protection – A new area of concern and focus will be brand protection.  Not the brand protection associated with intellectual property.  While that concern does exist with the growth of on-line market places, the brand protection in this context relates to avoiding blemishes to your brand associated with vendor mis-management.

In the normal course of business, companies purchase inputs for their products or services from external vendors.  Interacting with vendors is critical for all businesses.  However, third party vendors create a certain level of risk that should be controlled and managed.  What would be the impact on your organization if your vendor fails?

Consider the following – Defective air bags from a vendor are causing recalls to be issued for Honda, Toyota, Nissan and General Motors Co.; faulty ignition-switches are central to General Motors recalls and  a lawsuit.  One year after the announcement of a strategic partnership, an Apple vendor filed for bankruptcy.  Hackers breached the systems of both Target and Home Depot by going through vendors of the respective companies.

Update – Apple Watch: Faulty Taptic Engine Slows Rollout, WSJ (4/29/2015) – “A key component of the Apple Watch made by one of two suppliers was found to be defective, prompting Apple Inc. to limit the availability of the highly anticipated new product, according to people familiar with the matter.”

Vendor Management should be a part of your Business Continuity Plan.

Regulation and Taxation – The adoption of increased regulation is associated with increased costs.  With every change an organization is required to analyze the new regulation, develop a plan to implement the regulation, develop training for current staff, potentially be required to hire new staff, and monitor implementation.  It is for this reason that time is a very important element when adopting new regulations.

Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

Healthcare is now moving into the next phase as penalties for not covering employees are set to take effect.    With respect to ensuring compliance with the law, employers must comply with certain IRS reporting and disclosure requirements, which are important for the administration of the individual and employer mandates.  This reporting will be required beginning in 2016 for coverage provided during the 2015 calendar year.  By January 31, 2016, you must provide a notice called the 1095 to everyone who was on payroll in 2015; as well as file a form called the 1094 with the IRS.

To alleviate the burden in 2016, it is recommended that the following steps be adopted – Review IRS Reporting requirements under Sections 6055 and 6056; determine what applies to your organization; determine the information that must be gathered; develop an approach; and establish a procedure to collect and maintain the data.  It will be far easier to collect data going forward then to scramble in January 2016 to complete a form.

Taxation

In 2013, 55 tax provisions expired, of which 24 would be categorized as business provisions.  In 2014, 6 tax provisions are slated for expiration.  Of the six, three provisions relate to Alternative vehicle/fuel; while three provisions relate to defined benefit pensions.

It may make sense to review the 61 provisions, as Congress can extend them retroactively for 2014.

Debt Collection

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) filed a lawsuit against a firm for its debt collection tactics ((http://files.consumerfinance.gov/f/201407_cfpb_complaint_hanna.pdf).  As stated in the law suit – “…the Firm operates less like a law firm than a factory. It relies on an automated system and non-attorney support staff to determine which consumers to sue. The non-attorney support staff produce the lawsuits and place them into mail buckets, which are then delivered to attorneys essentially waiting at the end of an assembly line. The Firm’s attorneys are expected to spend less than a minute reviewing and approving each suit.”

You cannot help but see the parallels between this situation and the robo-signing scandal relating to foreclosures which took off in 2010.  As a result of that scandal, in February 2013, a settlement deal was entered into with 13 banks over foreclosure abuses.  The cost of the settlement – $9.3 billion.

If you extend credit to your customers, which is required for almost all businesses, a certain amount of bad debt will result.  Now with the potential of legal action, it is more important to develop a strategy to efficiently and legally assert your rights of collection.

Optimizing the Business – When business is good, it is very easy to overlook inefficiency.  But if sales decline or stay static and costs continue to rise, profits must decline.  To thrive, a business must evolve and stay focused on optimizing business processes by removing inefficiencies and waste, to contain costs.

  • Focus on Cash Flow. Poor cash flow management will impact a business by constraining its ability to fill orders timely if inputs and/or inventory purchases are delayed; replacing outdated equipment; and, implementing process improvement which historically has upfront costs, prior to the savings.
  • Review product lines and services, to understand the profitability generated. The natural result will be an emphasis on the most profitable activities; while de-emphasizing the less profitable or money loosing activities.
  • Review customer/client relationships,to understand the relationship value. Obtaining a customer that becomes unprofitable is a common situation. It only becomes an error of management if you do not review the economics of each client periodically, or ignore the results after the review. If you discover that a client is unprofitable, try to correct the situation or walk away from the client.
  • Review and Improve Business Management and Production Processes. Process improvement is undertaken for a multitude of reasons which include – improve customer satisfaction, improve employee satisfaction, eliminate/contain non-value added costs.  Several back-office tasks should be consistently managed closely. More than likely these areas represent straight expense, but are critical to the successful management of any business, i.e. Accounting, Finance, Administration.

No doubt 2015 will be a challenging year.

Author: Regis Quirin
Visit Regis's Website - Email Regis
Regis Quirin is a financial executive with 23 years of corporate experience, i.e. New York Stock Exchange, JP Morgan Chase, and GMAC ResCap; and 15 years working with small and medium-sized entities, i.e. joint ventures, start-up entities, established businesses. In 2014, Regis published "Redesign to Turnaround Underperforming Small and Medium-Sized Businesses" available via Amazon.

The Company Lifecycle

The classic lifecycle is used to describe the phases that most products go through, i.e. Introduction, Growth, Maturity, Decline. Products move from one phase to the next phase in succession. The most successful products move slowly through each phase.

Similar to a product that has a lifecycle, companies have a lifecycle.  The company lifecycle includes Introduction, Growth, Redesign, Maturity, and Merger & Acquisition. The goal of any business is to completely avoid the decline phase. During the decline phase it is not uncommon for a successful business to be acquired by a larger entity. But companies do not move from one phase to the next phase in sequence. The most successful companies will constantly shift back and forth between the growth to redesign to the maturity phase.

For a company, the phases are as follows –

Introductory Phase

This period is characterized by a heavy marketing focus. The company consumes cash to establish and build a brand. It is possible to lose the profit focus and instead be driven by revenues and customer acquisition counts. Pricing is set to promote client purchase. Within the business itself, staffing is low. Multiple tasks are being performed by a few individuals. These individuals may be required to manage different aspects of the business, which are not representative of their primary skill set. It is in this phase where a large number of start-up entities perish.

Growth Phase

A victim of its own success, a company grows production and distribution rapidly. The company reacts to the sudden increase in business and creates processes that are inefficient; contracts are signed quickly, increasing the potential for error; employee overhead rises through increased overtime or additional headcount; and cash outlays jump to manage the increased business.

Redesign Phase

In this phase the focus turns to stream-lining processes and cost containment. Interestingly, the method to redesign a business is the implementation of standard business management “best practices.”

  • Focus on Cash Flow. Poor cash flow management will impact a business by constraining its ability to fill orders timely if inputs and/or inventory purchases are delayed; replacing outdated equipment; and, implementing process improvement which historically has upfront costs, prior to the savings.
  • Review product lines and services, to understand the profitability generated. The natural result will be an emphasis on the most profitable activities; while de-emphasizing the less profitable or money loosing activities.
  • Review customer/client relationships, to understand the relationship value. Obtaining a customer that becomes unprofitable is a common situation. It only becomes an error of management if you do not review the economics of each client periodically, or ignore the results after the review. If you discover that a client is unprofitable, try to correct the situation or walk away from the client.
  • Review and Improve Production/Service Processes. Process improvement is undertaken for a multitude of reasons which include – improve customer satisfaction, improve employee satisfaction, eliminate/contain non-value added costs. A non-value added cost is an expense that is incurred, but does not add to the value or perceived value of your product or service. Simply stated, it is a cost your customers will not want to pay. Instead you will assume the cost out of your profits. Company owners should attempt to protect their profit margins by eliminating or containing non-value added costs.
  • Review and Improve Back-Office Processes. Several back-office tasks should be consistently managed closely. While more than likely these areas represent straight expense, all are critical to the successful management of any business.
  1. Accounting Management tasks include – Processing accurate state and federal filings; producing timely monthly financial statements; managing cash flow, i.e. receivables and payables; and responding to senior managers’ ad hoc questions.
  2. Financial Management – Providing critical financial and operational information to partners, with actionable recommendations on both strategy and operations, will allow your business to maximize profits: developing budgets/plans and analyzing financial variances to plan; installing a system of activity-based financial analysis; and managing vendor relationships to control expenses.
  3. Risk Management – A solid risk management program will reduce the probability of business disruptions, i.e. ensuring maintenance of appropriate internal controls and financial procedures; implementing financial and accounting “Best Practices;” and establishing metric(s) for each risk with corresponding tolerance range(s); and implementing a process of the timely distribution of critical success measures via a scorecard.
  4. Strategy Development – Analyzing business initiatives to determine expected cash flow, i.e. opening/closing offices, asset acquisition, new service launches; projecting impact of relationship pricing over time; and implementing processes that may open up new sources of business, i.e. sustainability, business continuity, engaging past customers.

Maturity Phase

In situations where offerings are similar, differentiation must be established at the company level. Why would consumers buy from me vs. my competitors, if I offer similar products? In this situation the company must adjust the value it delivers to customers, i.e. its value proposition. The answer to the question – you should buy from me because my product/service is superior and my knowledge, experience and customer service expertise will provide you with enhanced benefits.

As mentioned previously, the most successful companies will constantly shift back and forth between the growth to redesign to the maturity phase.

What phase is your company in?

Author: Regis Quirin
Visit Regis's Website - Email Regis
Regis Quirin is a financial executive with 23 years of corporate experience, i.e. New York Stock Exchange, JP Morgan Chase, and GMAC ResCap; and 15 years working with small and medium-sized entities, i.e. joint ventures, start-up entities, established businesses. In 2014, Regis published "Redesign to Turnaround Underperforming Small and Medium-Sized Businesses" available via Amazon.

Diversification or Divestment – Opposite ends of the same Strategy

When an entrepreneur starts a business, there is usually one product/service in mind.  They are focused on marketing and distribution.  As they grow, they begin to think about diversifying the business mix.  But whether your business sells Real Estate, Insurance or widgets, the primary reasons for diversification are to reduce risk, stabilize cash flow, and preserve a competitive advantage.  Through diversification, you can

-Ensure sales during seasons when the demand for your primary product is low.  In this situation, a firm should sell a related product that is active during business lulls, i.e. firm sells heating systems, as well as air cooling systems;

-Satisfy customer demands for related products.  One mistake in business is to refer your client to a competitor, to satisfy a need which you cannot fill.  More than likely, once they go, they will never come back.  One stop shopping for customers is always preferable over visiting multiple vendors;

-Assume control of a supply or distribution chain, i.e. Amazon begins Sunday deliveries, to increase customer satisfaction;

-Stay competitive by exploring growth opportunities, i.e. develop new markets and/or attract new customers; and,

-Balance a business which has long periods between sales with a quick sales cycle, i.e. automotive sales which may occur every five years, offering auto service which occurs every six months.

From a purely finance perspective, when investing capital to achieve growth, only commit capital to those projects that meet your profit expectations, return on investment requirements and results in a positive free cash flow position.

Profit – Funds available after total expenses are deducted from total revenues.  The basis from which taxes are calculated.  Pre-tax profits can be calculated monthly, quarterly, annually.  This value is ideal to plan annually.

-Return on Investments (ROI) – Ratio of Income generated over dollars invested in a process or product financed, to stimulate the growth of the company.  ROI is usually tracked for three to five years.  This statistic should be used to ensure that financial resources are being allocated to growth opportunities with the highest returns.

-Free Cash Flow (FCF) – Funds available after paying expenses, adjusted for non-cash items, minus capital expenditures to maintain the firm’s current productive capacity, i.e. the amount available for distributions or future growth prospects. FCF is an annual measure.

A company that incorporates a diversification strategy should be prepared to also at times consider a divestment approach.  Periodically every business should review its product lines and services, to understand the profitability generated.  The natural result will be an emphasis on the most profitable activities; while de-emphasizing the less profitable or money loosing activities.  Through this exercise, you will quickly identify problems in products and service fulfillment.

When you discover a line or business that is not performing as planned, there will be three questions that need to be asked – Is the business inefficient, but can be optimized?  Is the business being managed by the correct person?  Is the activity important to the overall strategy of your business?

If this line or business is not critical to your strategy, it may be time to divest.

It is not uncommon to read the press and see an article about a company divesting of a subsidiary.  The next day, there is another press article that the same company is acquiring an entity.  There are multiple reasons why a business may divest itself of a product line or subsidiary – the business does not meet expectations of profits, return on investment, or free cash flow targets.  These success targets may have been missed due to faulty production assumptions in the planning of the new line or subsidiary; or external factors may make the business no longer profitable.  Common external factors include unexpected regulation or taxes that make the business more expensive than previously planned; or a new competitor enters the market with a lower cost of doing business.

But the greatest reason for divesting an unsuccessful line or business is to free capital, so it may be allocated to more profitable activities.

When was the last time your business mix was reviewed?

Author: Regis Quirin
Visit Regis's Website - Email Regis
Regis Quirin is a financial executive with 23 years of corporate experience, i.e. New York Stock Exchange, JP Morgan Chase, and GMAC ResCap; and 15 years working with small and medium-sized entities, i.e. joint ventures, start-up entities, established businesses. In 2014, Regis published "Redesign to Turnaround Underperforming Small and Medium-Sized Businesses" available via Amazon.

Big Data for Pricing Optimization

If you study Marketing, you learn that pricing is part of the “marketing mix.”  The firm combines price, product, place and promotion in the hope of finding the appropriate relationship to appeal to the target market.  The degree at which these variables are manipulated is based on available data, i.e. geographic assumptions and customer qualities within the geography.  If your product has features that are different from what is currently offered in the market, it may be possible to garner a higher price, if consumers can distinguish the feature differences.

But in situations where offerings are similar, differentiation must be established at the company level. Why would consumers buy from me vs. my competitors, if I offer similar products? In this situation the company must adjust the value it delivers to customers, i.e. its value proposition.  The answer to the question – you should buy from me because of my knowledge, experience and customer service expertise.  It may be possible to garner a higher price, if consumers can distinguish the value difference.

It only makes sense that if you improve the quality of the data used to make decisions regarding the marketing mix components and the value offered, the firm will benefit financially.  Through the use of large data sets that consider consumer preferences and actions “Big Data” analytics may help you achieve this goal.

As reported in Game changers: Five opportunities for US growth and renewal a McKinsey Global Institute study (July 2013), “Amazon has taken cross-selling to a new level with sophisticated predictive algorithms that prompt customers with recommendations for related products, services, bundled promotions, and even dynamic pricing; its recommendation engine reportedly drives 30 percent of sales.  But most retailers are still in the earliest stages of implementing these technologies and have achieved best-in-class performance only in narrow functions, such as merchandising or promotions.” (page 75)

Big Data analytics are typically used for the following –

-improve internal processes;

-improve products or services;

-develop new products or services; and,

-enhance targeted offerings.

Implementing a “Big Data” approach requires hardware, software and highly technical quantitative analysts that have the specific knowledge to glean results from large data sets.  If you were looking to investigate the potential benefits that you may receive from a Big Data analytics program, it would make sense to outsource a test.  If the test is successful and you believe that an internal resource should be developed, you will be in a better position to develop that function internally.

There are a few companies today that offer “Big Data” services – Accenture, Deloitte, Oracle, PROS Pricing, SAP, Vendavo, Vistaar, and Zillant.

Does your company use “Big Data?  How?

Author: Regis Quirin
Visit Regis's Website - Email Regis
Regis Quirin is a financial executive with 23 years of corporate experience, i.e. New York Stock Exchange, JP Morgan Chase, and GMAC ResCap; and 15 years working with small and medium-sized entities, i.e. joint ventures, start-up entities, established businesses. In 2014, Regis published "Redesign to Turnaround Underperforming Small and Medium-Sized Businesses" available via Amazon.