Business Disruption Survival Techniques

Establishing a twelve month budget/business planand a business continuity plan are still the best ways to prepare a business for the most probable known threats. But what can you do for unanticipated shocks that negatively affect your ability to achieve your profit goals? When companies are faced with unanticipated situations, that threaten their business, and they realize these disruptions are not short-term issues, they may need to employ “business disruption survival techniques.”

Examples of situations that few saw coming include – The sudden drop in the per barrel price of oil, i.e. NYMEX closing price $99.75 (6/30/2014) vs. $52.78 (02/13/2015), negatively impacting oil and gas companies, and the businesses that support them. Union disagreements and work stoppages at US ports along the West Coast, negatively impacting the inventory of many businesses that sell imported goods. This situation is believed to be resolved, after nine months. The climb in the value of the dollar against most currencies, resulting in exports becoming more expensive, while imports become cheaper.

In reacting to these shocks, businesses implement three main types of cuts, for the sake of temporary relief, i.e. expense personnel, expense non-personnel and investments. If not done correctly, these approaches may do more long-term harm, than good. Activities are as follows –

Slash budgets (Personnel Expenses) – As personnel expenses are the largest cost associated with every business, targeting this expense is usually the first move. This tactic includes implementing hiring freezes and job eliminations.

Additional approaches include salary freezes; bonus reductions; and reducing or eliminating the company investment in the employee, i.e. usually related to education subsidies. More often than not these approaches will leave you with a large exodus from among the high performing dis-satisfied employees that can move to your competitors.

A popular technique which I believe is a big mistake is to provide a stay bonus to a select few. The message relayed with this last strategy, “If you did not receive a bonus, you are not considered critical to the organization.”

Slash budgets (Non-Personnel Expenses) – In the short-run, fixed expenses cannot be slashed, i.e. rent, insurance… The target of this tactic is usually variable expenses, i.e. marketing. But during this time of a disruption, marketing is very important to bring in new sources of revenues.

Delay Investments (Revenues) – To preserve cash during tough times, companies may place a hold on investments until the difficulties pass. But why would you wish to delay the opportunity for revenues, associated with a new product or service?

To avoid the slash and burn mentality, establish an environment of constant review and analysis. Do not wait until you are forced to make a large correction. Make small adjustments to your business, continually along the way. Suggested areas to monitor include –

Review Client Arrangements – Obtaining a customer that becomes unprofitable is a common situation. It only becomes an error of management if you do not constantly review the situation to understand the returns.

Review Products or Services – Periodically every business should review its product lines and services, to understand the profitability generated. The natural result will be an emphasis on the most profitable activities; while de-emphasizing the less profitable or money loosing activities.

Review Accounts Receivables – If you extend credit to your customers, which is required for almost all businesses, a certain amount of bad debt will result. At a certain point, you will need to ask for what you are owed. Resolving this bad debt efficiently and quickly, while not disrupting the possibility of future business from the customer takes tact and experience.

Understand Variable Expenses – Review your needs – Contracts represent your needs at a point in time, i.e. when they were executed. It makes sense that a contract will include items you no longer need – understand needs; understand pricing alternatives; seek opportunities to bundle; and avoid the warranty trap with new technology.

Consider Business Management Practices – The solution to counter an underperforming small or medium-sized business is a redesign. Interestingly, the method to redesign a business is the implementation of standard business management “best practices.”

Continue to Review Investment Opportunities – A company should only allocate cash to the most profitable uses, with the highest return on investment, which will provide potential distributable benefits to its investors, within the shortest amount of time.

Survival will be based on your ability to shift quickly, but strategically.

You can never plan for external disruptions, but you can prepare. Do the analysis today.

Author: Regis Quirin
Visit Regis's Website - Email Regis
Regis Quirin is a financial executive with 23 years of corporate experience, i.e. New York Stock Exchange, JP Morgan Chase, and GMAC ResCap; and 15 years working with small and medium-sized entities, i.e. joint ventures, start-up entities, established businesses. In 2014, Regis published "Redesign to Turnaround Underperforming Small and Medium-Sized Businesses" available via Amazon.

“We’ve reached the halfway point of HP’s turnaround”

In a letter dated June 2014, Rob Binns Vice President, Hewlett-Packard (HP) Investor Relations stated, “We’ve reached the halfway point of HP’s turnaround.”  The turnaround journey began when Meg Whitman joined Hewlett Packard as President and CEO in September 2011.  She was preceded by Carly Fiorina (1999 – 2005); and Mark Hurd (2006 – 2010).  This ten year period prior to Ms. Whitman’s arrival was marked by mergers including Compaq and EDS, headcount reductions, executive attrition, and sending jobs offshore.

Additionally, since 2002 HP transformed from a printing company, where 40% of revenues and 95% of profits came from this line of business; to a diversified technology company today, where printing accounts for only 20% of revenues and 30% of profits at HP.  Even after these changes, it became clear that a Business Turnaround was required.

The clearest indication that a Business Turnaround is required, is after a steady erosion of your business economics.

Since a peak experienced in the fourth quarter of 2010, declines were seen in several key statistics.

Annual Statistics Revenues ($000) Gross Profit ($000) Operating Margin Long-Term Debt ($000)
10.31.2010 $126,033,000 $30,181,000 9% $15,258,000
10.31.2011 $127,245,000 $29,827,000 8% $22,551,000
10.31.2012 $120,357,000 $27,972,000 9% $21,789,000
10.31.2013 $112,298,000 $25,918,000 6% $16,608,000

Source: http://www.nasdaq.com/symbol/hpq/

Once the decision is made to Turnaround a Business, a detailed internal assessment is undertaken to identify areas that require a redesign. 

Fiscal years 2012 and 2013 were the years of assessment at HP.  Problems identified as needing correction included –

Strategy and Planning – As is common in situations where management turnover occurs, strategy becomes inconsistent, which is confusing to customers, negatively impacting sales.  Detailed business unit strategies, tightly linked to desired financial outcomes, are required.   HP needs to assume a focus on customer needs; and competitor offerings.

Cash Flow and Reporting – HP requires a cost management program; as well as a disciplined capital allocation strategy.  Periodic business reviews are required to review success and modify plans, if needed.  A performance management system should be implemented; where compensation and accountability are linked.

Business Processes and Support Functions – Business activities should be streamlined, with inefficiencies and duplications removed.  A consistent level of quality should be established.  Automation should be utilized whenever possible, i.e. labor and contact relationship management systems.

Business Development – Marketing should be centralized to take advantage of unified media buying and the potential for discounting.  Sales – Improve the sales processes.  Implement a renewed focus on solution selling; and re-train, if applicable; Products – Weed out unprofitable products and identify product gaps.  Move faster at commercializing innovations investment; and, Customers – Improve the results from underperforming accounts.

But on October 6, 2014, it was announced that HP will split into two companies.  Hewlett-Packard Enterprise – a company that will compete within the IT market, serving key markets that include – servers, networking, software, converged systems, storage, services, and cloud; and, HP Inc. – a company that will compete within the IT market, serving key markets that include – notebooks, mobility, ink printing, managed print services, desktops, graphics, and laser printing.  The split is slated to be completed by the end of fiscal year 2015.

What will be interesting to see is how these two different approaches will be integrated successfully.  In a perfect world, HP would solve the deficiencies outlined above, prior to the break-up into two companies.  In this way each entity that will be launched will be an efficient entity, with all processes optimized to be profitable.

Author: Regis Quirin
Visit Regis's Website - Email Regis
Regis Quirin is a financial executive with 23 years of corporate experience, i.e. New York Stock Exchange, JP Morgan Chase, and GMAC ResCap; and 15 years working with small and medium-sized entities, i.e. joint ventures, start-up entities, established businesses. In 2014, Regis published "Redesign to Turnaround Underperforming Small and Medium-Sized Businesses" available via Amazon.

Why are so many companies announcing a Turnaround?

So far in 2014, turnarounds have been discussed domestically at Radio Shack, Yahoo, Best Buy, Lowe’s and JCPenney, to name a few.  Internationally, word of turnarounds have been reported at Sony, HTC, Carrefour…   So what has caused this trend?

Simply stated, when business is good, it is very easy to overlook inefficiency and waste.  But the macroeconomic weakness that is affecting the US is resulting in sales declines; while at the same time costs continue to rise. As a result, profits decline.  A business may find itself in need of turnaround assistance based on unforeseen external factors, i.e. a natural disaster, competition, new regulation, new taxation assessed federally or at the local level.  While internally, rapid unplanned growth can be very disruptive, if the focus turned away from profitability.  This growth may have been attributed to organic growth or a merger or acquisition.

The most detailed and transparent turnaround discussed is the turnaround at Hewlett Packard –

Meg Whitman joined HP as the President and Chief Executive Officer in September 2011.  After a year of assessing the HP situation, Ms. Whitman announced a Turnaround.  At a Security Analyst Meeting (10/03/2012), Ms. Whitman attributed the need for a turnaround to several factors, including a change in the IT industry; constant change in executive leadership of the company; decentralized marketing; integration of acquired companies; misalignment of compensation and accountability; lack of metrics and scorecards to manage the business; lack of a cost containment focus; product gaps; and ineffective sales management.  The turnaround which began in 2012 is expected to take hold by 2016.

The solution to counter this situation is a redesign, i.e. a focus on stream-lining processes and cost containment.  Interestingly, the method to redesign a business is the implementation of standard business management “best practices.”  But to fully implement a turnaround, innovation and growth will be required.  Customers’ needs must be placed at the center of your decision making and a focus on business development will be required.

Start by assessing and understanding the amount of change required and develop approaches that will minimize the potential for disruption.

Superior management and flawless execution will be required.  Each member of the management team should understand their responsibility and be committed to work together as a team to redesign to turnaround the underperforming business.  A commitment to financial discipline and a returns based capital allocation strategy is required.

Going forward, managing the business should be accomplished from a data based perspective.  Any decision regarding the use of funds and or the changing of strategies needs to be quantified.  Opinions should be the basis for investigation, but data should be the reason for actions.  An executive needs to be able to read financial and production numbers; as well as understand the significance of combining the data sets to grow.  If you do not understand the drivers of revenues and expenses, or the significance of production data, any decision will be a best guess on how to proceed.

If you understand the current situation with respect to the market, competitors, customers and employees, you will be better able to develop detailed strategies that allow you to minimize weakness, maximize opportunities, and mitigate threats.

Managing cash flow is critical.  The optimal approach is to employ conservative and sound financial and accounting policies; maintain a strong working capital position; and implement accurate and responsible reporting that looks at variances to established plans.

In a turnaround situation, a “best practice” is to document and review policies and procedures; to stream-line and remove inefficiencies; discontinue manual tasks through automation; and, enhance security through segregation of duties.  The outcome will naturally be cost savings.  Circumventing established policies and procedures exposes the firm to errors, unnecessary risks and costs associated with wasted time.

If you are in a business turnaround situation, it is very easy to think the proper decision is to slash the marketing budget to cut expenses.  But, it is during these tough times that marketing and sales are the most important.  As expenses keep increasing, revenues at the very least must keep pace, or profits suffer.  Annually, new customers must be sourced.

The role of your marketing department is to collaborate on strategic campaigns and point of sale initiatives; while fostering a consistent and standard sales approach across all corporate communications and marketing efforts.

The redesign steps are as follows –

  • Communicate the need to redesign to senior managers and the board of directors, to gain concurrence;
  • Select a respected executive with the authority to cross department lines to lead the project.  This individual will be the champion of the project and facilitate the integration of change;
  • Perform a key assessment of the organization to prioritize the trouble spots;
  • Set strategy and establish a cash flow plan for the next 12 months, based on the current situation;
  • Communicate the strategy companywide, as well as the intentions to redesign companywide processes, to gain employee understanding and involvement in the process;
  • Optimize support functions; and,
  • Emphasize business development to grow.

Communicate with the Board of Directors, throughout the process.

The speed at which the process can be completed will be based on the amount of redesign required and the commitment of your management and staff to make required changes.

 

In 2014, Regis published Redesign to Turnaround Underperforming Small and Medium-Sized Businesses.  To read chapter one of the manuscript, click Here.  Recommendations so far have been positive.  To order your copy, click

Redesign to Turnaround Underperforming Small and Medium-Sized Businesses

Author: Regis Quirin
Visit Regis's Website - Email Regis
Regis Quirin is a financial executive with 23 years of corporate experience, i.e. New York Stock Exchange, JP Morgan Chase, and GMAC ResCap; and 15 years working with small and medium-sized entities, i.e. joint ventures, start-up entities, established businesses. In 2014, Regis published "Redesign to Turnaround Underperforming Small and Medium-Sized Businesses" available via Amazon.

Tips to Mitigate Technology Implementation Challenges

Companies continually look for ways to reduce costs, facilitate sales, and increase customer satisfaction.  While there are a multitude of specific approaches that could be utilized to address each issue, all three of these objectives could be achieved at the same time through automation.  Production systems serve to increase sales efficiency and introduce cross-sell opportunities; while the implementation of back office systems serve to drive support efficiencies and remove non-value added costs.  Efficiencies that improve the sales process and/or the customer service process will result in increased customer satisfaction.

But, prior to searching for the best enterprise system solution for your business needs, establish your preliminary budget.  Consider licensing fees, development costs (external and internal), as well as the conversion costs.  Compute your expected Return on Investments (ROI), which is the ratio of income generated less dollars invested, over dollars invested in a process or product financed, to stimulate the growth of the company.  This statistic should be used to ensure that your financial resources are being allocated to growth opportunities with the highest returns.  As you get closer to selecting the new technology, these numbers should be revised.

Just keep in mind, any change in your business model will cause a certain level of disruption, regardless of the size of the system to be implemented.  If not executed correctly, the new system may cost you more than you expected, both today and in the future.  Proper planning is critical.  In my experience, the top issues which raise the cost of the development are consistent across different platforms, and not specific to the size of the company.  These are common issues associated with all technology implementations.

Issue #1 – Customization – When an off the shelf enterprise system is purchased or leased, a certain amount of customization will be required.  This customization serves to ensure a clear identification of features for the users, within the application, in the terms common to the business.  Another area that requires customization is the development of reports specific to managing the business or responding to client needs.  But all customization requires development time, that quickly raises the price of the new technology.  Be sure that the requested customizations are required.  Differentiate “nice to have” from “need to have.”  Negotiate and budget for this start-up expense.

Issue #2 – Integration – It is not uncommon for a business to be composed of a few systems with no integration.  This situation occurs when a business is growing and different departments purchase technology for their own areas, not considering the greater business.  This situation also is common for larger companies that recently experienced a merger.  It becomes obvious quickly, that different departments of the new business cannot communicate clearly with each other, as they are not all on the same platform.  Ensure that any new system is integrated within the company, satisfying the needs of a few departments.  At the very least, there should be integration between your productions system and financial system.  Integration requires development time and quickly raises the price of the new technology.

Issue #3 – Data Quality – When introducing new systems or upgrades, information maintained in either a legacy system or a homegrown database may be incomplete and inconsistent.  Information clean-up is time consuming and has an internal cost.  But correcting deficiencies today is a worthwhile project, vs. perpetuating issues in your new technology application.

Following are “best practices” to avoid these issues or at least reduce the negative impacts associated with implementing and managing new technology within your business –

Understand your Technology Needs – Assess the current needs of your customers (internal or external); while also considering their future needs.  This step may include surveys and focus groups with the users.  Flowchart the process today and identify what happens when things occur without issue.  Analyze the flow.  Are processes as efficient as they could be?  Now consider the experience when breakage(s) occur.  At what point in the flow does it happen?  How can this situation be avoided?

During this process, continue to consider user acceptance. If your system is not intuitive, external users may not wish to use it; and internal users may not transition to the new platform quickly, making conversion a long and drawn out process.

The output of this analysis should be reviewed with key stakeholders to gather their thoughts and views.  The result of this task will be a clear understanding of the business needs.  Document this information.

Next, issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) to service providers.  There are very few processes where there is not more than one supplier.  Send the RFP to at least three providers.

Develop a relationship that compliments your business – When considering a technology solution; the vendor relationship is as important as the technology being purchased/leased.  Prior to entering into any relationship, keep in mind, that there are common risks inherent with all vendors –

  • Employee quality – vendor employees requiring special knowledge, licensing, certification;
  • Privacy policy – sharing information regarding your processes and procedures, as well as customer information;
  • Business continuity – impact of a disruption in your vendor’s business on you; and,
  • Service quality – impact on your internal and external customers.

Establishing your requirements and how you will work with the vendor, prior to entering into a relationship, would be time well spent.

If the technology fits your needs; if the vendor will be a good partner for your business; and if the final budget and ROI are acceptable – it is time to draft the contract and statement of work.

As stated previously, proper planning associated with the integration of a new enterprise solution will ensure your selection satisfies the process improvement and cost containment needs of your business within the established budget, while achieving the required ROI.

I wrote this article for CIO Review Magazine-Corporate Finance Technology Special 2014 (April 2014)  The story can be found on page 50.

 

Author: Regis Quirin
Visit Regis's Website - Email Regis
Regis Quirin is a financial executive with 23 years of corporate experience, i.e. New York Stock Exchange, JP Morgan Chase, and GMAC ResCap; and 15 years working with small and medium-sized entities, i.e. joint ventures, start-up entities, established businesses. In 2014, Regis published "Redesign to Turnaround Underperforming Small and Medium-Sized Businesses" available via Amazon.

Redesign to Turnaround Underperforming Small and Medium-Sized Business

There are many reasons why an organization may require business turnaround assistance.  Rarely is it due to a single factor.  A business may find itself in need of assistance based on unforeseen external factors, i.e. a natural disaster, competition, new regulation, new taxation assessed federally or at the local level.

Internal reasons for turnaround assistance may be attributed to a period of high growth.  Rapid unplanned growth can be very disruptive, if the focus turns away from profitability.  It is not uncommon for any or a combination of the following situations to occur – customer service declines, as well as customer satisfaction; company reacts to the sudden increase in business and creates processes that are inefficient; contracts are signed quickly, increasing the potential for error; employee overhead rises through increased overtime or additional headcount; and cash outlays jump to manage the increased business.

Years later you stop and look at the business and discover things are inefficient and costly.  An Accounting colleague once advised that often times he is asked to look at an established business to help them correct a low profitability issue.   He reflected on the fact that, “Most of the time when a business comes to me for help, it is already too late.”  You need to understand when a problem exists.

The clearest sign that turnaround assistance is required is after a steady erosion of your business economics.  Profitability continues to decline because –

  • Revenue increases year-over-year are anemic due to continual price pressure in a mature industry;

  • Marketing efforts are not organized and occur sporadically, i.e. the volume of new business, only serves to replace terminating relationships;

  • Employment and administrative expenses increase; and,

  • Competition is fierce.

But even after pointing out the data that shows a sustained economic decline, do not be surprised to hear management colleagues provide the following excuses –

  • The company’s economic issues are attributed to only one department or product.  Just fix that area;

  • There are quick fixes that can solve all our problems;

  • A problem does not exist.  We are just experiencing a rough patch that will self-correct;

  • Recent short-term revenue increases signify that a problem no longer exists; and,

  • We can solve the issues through expense reductions only.

The solution to counter an underperforming small or medium-sized business is a redesign.  Interestingly, the method to redesign a business is the implementation of standard business management “best practices.”

Following are six areas, that when optimized will increase the probability of success for your organization –

Management

Understand the economic drivers of your business; and study the production results of your efforts.  Make a commitment to financial discipline and prudent growth.

It is important that the entire management team of the organization is in agreement that a business redesign is necessary.  I have seen situations where one manager recognizes an issue, while another does not.  To be successful, you will need complete support from all managers.

There will be times when hard decisions will need to be made.  Complete commitment to the process is required.  If during the course of the redesign, things improve for a short period; do not stop implementing the corrective measures.  Trust your analysis.  Improved returns may not mean the problems are solved.

Diagnose the Depth of the Issues

The first step is to critically look at your establishment to understand the state of your business management practices.  As a result of this review you will be able to develop a list of areas that need adjustment.  Some improvements may require only a slight modification to your current processes; while other improvements may represent a large change to your approach.  Once the issues are identified, you will need to prioritize the adjustments to your business model.

Develop an Appropriate Strategy

Understand the market and survey internally and externally, i.e. competitors, customers and employees.  Develop detailed strategies that allow you to minimize weakness, maximize opportunities, and mitigate threats.  Communicate the strategies throughout the organization.

There are many strategies that a company could adopt.  However, if you are in a turnaround situation, your business energies and the corresponding strategies should be focused on efficiency and growth – become the low cost provider; differentiate your product or service in the market; be the value provider; and, adopt a customer centric approach.

Plan and Actively Manage Cash Flow

Cash Flow can be considered the barometer of the financial health of any organization.  An effective cash flow policy includes ongoing financial management.  In a perfect world, your monthly revenues cover your monthly expenses and leave a surplus, i.e. a profit that increases cash reserves.  But the perfect world is a theoretical place.

Success requires planning and a constant review of how your actual results compare to your plans.  Through this approach, you will be better able to make small adjustments to help you reach your financial goals.

Communicate the overall plan company-wide.  Involve employees and managers in the company redesign.  Set a plan and establish metrics.  Monthly distribute a one page document to the employees in the organization that clearly tells how the organization is doing compared to the metrics established during the planning process, i.e. a Scorecard.

A redesign to turnaround a business cannot be completed behind the scenes.  Progress sharing with your employees is very important.

Optimize Support Functions

Most processes work best when there is consistency.  Variations in activities and manual processes create a higher probability of error and expose the organization to unnecessary risks and time wasting.

Out of the ordinary tasks should be the exceptions.  Not the rule.

The task of documenting policies and procedures makes you critically look at processes and identify how things may be accomplished more efficiently.  A natural outcome in the short-run will be a reduction in costs.

Optimize Business Development

Marketing is a service that supports the sales efforts of the organization, by providing tools to foster lead generation, customer retention and relationship development/management.  This area should ensure the business is efficient, effective, and provides top tier product/service delivery capabilities. The focus should be to maximize profitability and increase customer satisfaction while maintaining appropriate risk controls.

Regardless if your organization has an extensive marketing group or not, there are a few staples critical to a successful approach to generating new business: create clear and concise brand positioning; produce targeted promotional materials which may include a selection of brochures, ads, flyers, and e-newsletters; build an on-line presence that may include a social media component; measure and track business results; and, manage the organization’s Customer Relationship Management (CRM) system.

Implementing adjustments to these six areas may represent a change in the way you have been conducting business to date.  New ideas cause disruption.  Closely monitor process change results and adjust, as required.  It is the commitment of your managers and dedication of your employees that will be required to ensure flawless execution and success.

You will benefit from an immediate savings through cost containment, once business operations are optimized.  But a complete turnaround requires successful marketing and sales.  A complete turnaround requires both revenue enhancements, as well as cost containment.

I have found that small or medium-sized businesses may incorporate some of the concepts, but rarely all of the concepts.  However each large Fortune 100 company I worked with incorporated every one of the concepts.  These are proven methods of success.

The blog you just reviewed is chapter one of a book that I published.  This book is a little different as it is experience based vs. academic based, i.e. what has worked in my career.  The book discusses each solution in the context of how it was observed in business.  I wanted a tool that a business owner could pick-up and use with practical recommendations, that can be applied across industries.

If you wish to read more, the complete book is available here –

Redesign to Turnaround Underperforming Small and Medium-Sized Businesses

 

Author: Regis Quirin
Visit Regis's Website - Email Regis
Regis Quirin is a financial executive with 23 years of corporate experience, i.e. New York Stock Exchange, JP Morgan Chase, and GMAC ResCap; and 15 years working with small and medium-sized entities, i.e. joint ventures, start-up entities, established businesses. In 2014, Regis published "Redesign to Turnaround Underperforming Small and Medium-Sized Businesses" available via Amazon.

Should TeleCommuting be a part of your company’s plan?

“Census data indicate that the rate of telecommuting has plateaued at about 17 percent of the U.S. workforce, with the average telecommuter working from home about one day per week.” (US News, Telecommuting Can Boost Productivity and Job Performance, 03.15.2013).

The benefits of telecommuting have been extensively documented. For the employer, the benefits include increased productivity, reduced absenteeism, decreased attrition, reduced brick and mortar expense, and a labor pool that is not geographically constrained. For the employee, they can avoid a morning commute and help with work-life balancing.

But according to research performed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and published in the Monthly Labor Review – 2012, data showed that providing the option to log-in remotely for employees, served primarily to help expand the workday, more so than replace the company office with the home office.

So why is the frequency of telecommuting not growing?

The truth is that there are some positions/tasks that can be completed 100% offsite; while there are other positions that can’t be.  Aetna boasts that 47% of its 35,000 US workforce works from home.  Historically sales positions have worked off-site.  While positions that require interaction with colleagues within the organization do not lend themselves to tele-commuting.

This past February, Marissa Mayer (CEO), reversed a Yahoo policy.  Working from home was no longer an option for Yahoo employees. Instead, employees would be required to work from a Yahoo location. The reason for the policy change was to facilitate “communication and collaboration.”

Once you identify the roles that can work remotely —

In addition to the technology which is business specific, ensure you establish policies at the company level that all employees are required to follow.  Ensure these policies are fully documented and include provisions regarding equipment responsibility, data security and client privacy.  The way employees that telecommute are managed should be established early on to avoid the employee feeling excluded and disconnected from the company.

But caution is warranted —

Recent claims have been made in court by plaintiffs that asserted that tele-commuting was justified for an organization to offer reasonable accommodations as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act, i.e. Bixby v. JPMorgan Chase; Core v. Champaign County Board of County Commissioners; and EEOC v. Ford Motor Co.

As such, do not leave the decision to allow a tele-commuting arrangement to be established at the local manager level.  This approach will result in different managers having different policies and may create a liability for the company.  Establish one policy and ensure that all follow it.  Seek the input of an employment attorney.

Where is your company in this process?

Author: Regis Quirin
Visit Regis's Website - Email Regis
Regis Quirin is a financial executive with 23 years of corporate experience, i.e. New York Stock Exchange, JP Morgan Chase, and GMAC ResCap; and 15 years working with small and medium-sized entities, i.e. joint ventures, start-up entities, established businesses. In 2014, Regis published "Redesign to Turnaround Underperforming Small and Medium-Sized Businesses" available via Amazon.