Emotions in Business – Yes or No?

Probably one of the most important concepts in any business is to control emotions.  It is emotion that is critical in creative thinking and self-motivation.  However, un-controlled emotions are a liability.  Nothing destroys economics more than emotions.  I learned this concept in college, but have seen it played out with many companies I have managed as their financial support, time-and-time again.

It is understood that emotions cloud decision making.  For example, a practice within real estate sales is to make the buyer “fall in love with the property.”  Help the buyer visualize themselves in the home.  I have heard of real estate agents baking cookies so home visitors feel welcomed, during open houses.

In the end, if you bid on the property, it is advisable to know the maximum price you are willing to pay for it, and know when to walk away from the deal.  If you get wrapped up in the moment, you risk bidding beyond your means.

Clearly with respect to personal situations, we try to control emotions.  But when the question turns to emotions in business, there are two very different points of view –

In business you should be emotionless.  Inherent in business are successes and disappointments.  If things do not go your way, an objective solution is preferable to a subjective reaction.

If you find your company in a situation where profits are eroding, emotions should play a lesser role.  The best approach is to assess the situation, think of the options to solve the problem and chose the solution with the highest return and least probability of failure.  This approach is essentially mathematical.

The absence of emotions also can help when implementing fixes to your current business model.  You will be required to look at a business, and identify waste and inefficient processes.  At times the solution will have a negative impact on current employees either through their termination or a change to their job.  Having an emotional attachment will make it difficult to deliver bad news to the employee.

Counter point – Controlled emotions are not just acceptable but required to be successful.  If you are responsible to develop relationships and build trust, being devoid of emotions is not conducive to this goal.

Internally you will be required to build partnerships and motivate individuals within the organization, for the good of the company.  Employee involvement is important to the success of this endeavor.  Externally you must reach out to current customers and prospective clientele, to build relationships, for future business opportunities.

A turnaround requires more than just a great plan.  A turnaround requires flawless execution.  Emotions are useful to create trust, drive passion and helpful to motivate staff.

So what is the correct mix?  There are many tests that measure an individual’s approach in life.   IQ (intelligence quotient) measures an individual’s capacity to learn reason and apply that knowledge.  EQ (emotional quotient) measures an individual’s ability to read a situation, and apply intuition.  A high IQ, combined with a high EQ would seem to be the recipe for a highly successful individual in business.

There is a theory that building a team is made easier if you know the IQ vs. EQ mix represented by each team member.  In this way teams could be assembled with individuals that complement each other’s natural abilities.

But regardless of how you decide to proceed on the issue of emotions, keep in mind that the top reasons for employee law suits against businesses fall into the following categories – discrimination (sex, race, disability and national origin), harassment, retaliation against a whistleblower and wrongful termination.  In every situation, emotions play a role in these claims, as the employee feels they were wronged.  Valid claims or not, litigation is painful, expensive, and should be avoided.  Emotions throughout the organization should be controlled.

What are your thoughts?

This passage is an excerpt from my book, written in 2014 — “Redesign to Turnaround Underperforming Small and Medium-Sized Businesses” available via Amazon.

Author: Regis Quirin
Visit Regis's Website - Email Regis
Regis Quirin is a financial executive with 23 years of corporate experience, i.e. New York Stock Exchange, JP Morgan Chase, and GMAC ResCap; and 15 years working with small and medium-sized entities, i.e. joint ventures, start-up entities, established businesses. In 2014, Regis published "Redesign to Turnaround Underperforming Small and Medium-Sized Businesses" available via Amazon.

The Company Lifecycle

The classic lifecycle is used to describe the phases that most products go through, i.e. Introduction, Growth, Maturity, Decline. Products move from one phase to the next phase in succession. The most successful products move slowly through each phase.

Similar to a product that has a lifecycle, companies have a lifecycle.  The company lifecycle includes Introduction, Growth, Redesign, Maturity, and Merger & Acquisition. The goal of any business is to completely avoid the decline phase. During the decline phase it is not uncommon for a successful business to be acquired by a larger entity. But companies do not move from one phase to the next phase in sequence. The most successful companies will constantly shift back and forth between the growth to redesign to the maturity phase.

For a company, the phases are as follows –

Introductory Phase

This period is characterized by a heavy marketing focus. The company consumes cash to establish and build a brand. It is possible to lose the profit focus and instead be driven by revenues and customer acquisition counts. Pricing is set to promote client purchase. Within the business itself, staffing is low. Multiple tasks are being performed by a few individuals. These individuals may be required to manage different aspects of the business, which are not representative of their primary skill set. It is in this phase where a large number of start-up entities perish.

Growth Phase

A victim of its own success, a company grows production and distribution rapidly. The company reacts to the sudden increase in business and creates processes that are inefficient; contracts are signed quickly, increasing the potential for error; employee overhead rises through increased overtime or additional headcount; and cash outlays jump to manage the increased business.

Redesign Phase

In this phase the focus turns to stream-lining processes and cost containment. Interestingly, the method to redesign a business is the implementation of standard business management “best practices.”

  • Focus on Cash Flow. Poor cash flow management will impact a business by constraining its ability to fill orders timely if inputs and/or inventory purchases are delayed; replacing outdated equipment; and, implementing process improvement which historically has upfront costs, prior to the savings.
  • Review product lines and services, to understand the profitability generated. The natural result will be an emphasis on the most profitable activities; while de-emphasizing the less profitable or money loosing activities.
  • Review customer/client relationships, to understand the relationship value. Obtaining a customer that becomes unprofitable is a common situation. It only becomes an error of management if you do not review the economics of each client periodically, or ignore the results after the review. If you discover that a client is unprofitable, try to correct the situation or walk away from the client.
  • Review and Improve Production/Service Processes. Process improvement is undertaken for a multitude of reasons which include – improve customer satisfaction, improve employee satisfaction, eliminate/contain non-value added costs. A non-value added cost is an expense that is incurred, but does not add to the value or perceived value of your product or service. Simply stated, it is a cost your customers will not want to pay. Instead you will assume the cost out of your profits. Company owners should attempt to protect their profit margins by eliminating or containing non-value added costs.
  • Review and Improve Back-Office Processes. Several back-office tasks should be consistently managed closely. While more than likely these areas represent straight expense, all are critical to the successful management of any business.
  1. Accounting Management tasks include – Processing accurate state and federal filings; producing timely monthly financial statements; managing cash flow, i.e. receivables and payables; and responding to senior managers’ ad hoc questions.
  2. Financial Management – Providing critical financial and operational information to partners, with actionable recommendations on both strategy and operations, will allow your business to maximize profits: developing budgets/plans and analyzing financial variances to plan; installing a system of activity-based financial analysis; and managing vendor relationships to control expenses.
  3. Risk Management – A solid risk management program will reduce the probability of business disruptions, i.e. ensuring maintenance of appropriate internal controls and financial procedures; implementing financial and accounting “Best Practices;” and establishing metric(s) for each risk with corresponding tolerance range(s); and implementing a process of the timely distribution of critical success measures via a scorecard.
  4. Strategy Development – Analyzing business initiatives to determine expected cash flow, i.e. opening/closing offices, asset acquisition, new service launches; projecting impact of relationship pricing over time; and implementing processes that may open up new sources of business, i.e. sustainability, business continuity, engaging past customers.

Maturity Phase

In situations where offerings are similar, differentiation must be established at the company level. Why would consumers buy from me vs. my competitors, if I offer similar products? In this situation the company must adjust the value it delivers to customers, i.e. its value proposition. The answer to the question – you should buy from me because my product/service is superior and my knowledge, experience and customer service expertise will provide you with enhanced benefits.

As mentioned previously, the most successful companies will constantly shift back and forth between the growth to redesign to the maturity phase.

What phase is your company in?

Author: Regis Quirin
Visit Regis's Website - Email Regis
Regis Quirin is a financial executive with 23 years of corporate experience, i.e. New York Stock Exchange, JP Morgan Chase, and GMAC ResCap; and 15 years working with small and medium-sized entities, i.e. joint ventures, start-up entities, established businesses. In 2014, Regis published "Redesign to Turnaround Underperforming Small and Medium-Sized Businesses" available via Amazon.