Should TeleCommuting be a part of your company’s plan?

“Census data indicate that the rate of telecommuting has plateaued at about 17 percent of the U.S. workforce, with the average telecommuter working from home about one day per week.” (US News, Telecommuting Can Boost Productivity and Job Performance, 03.15.2013).

The benefits of telecommuting have been extensively documented. For the employer, the benefits include increased productivity, reduced absenteeism, decreased attrition, reduced brick and mortar expense, and a labor pool that is not geographically constrained. For the employee, they can avoid a morning commute and help with work-life balancing.

But according to research performed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and published in the Monthly Labor Review – 2012, data showed that providing the option to log-in remotely for employees, served primarily to help expand the workday, more so than replace the company office with the home office.

So why is the frequency of telecommuting not growing?

The truth is that there are some positions/tasks that can be completed 100% offsite; while there are other positions that can’t be.  Aetna boasts that 47% of its 35,000 US workforce works from home.  Historically sales positions have worked off-site.  While positions that require interaction with colleagues within the organization do not lend themselves to tele-commuting.

This past February, Marissa Mayer (CEO), reversed a Yahoo policy.  Working from home was no longer an option for Yahoo employees. Instead, employees would be required to work from a Yahoo location. The reason for the policy change was to facilitate “communication and collaboration.”

Once you identify the roles that can work remotely —

In addition to the technology which is business specific, ensure you establish policies at the company level that all employees are required to follow.  Ensure these policies are fully documented and include provisions regarding equipment responsibility, data security and client privacy.  The way employees that telecommute are managed should be established early on to avoid the employee feeling excluded and disconnected from the company.

But caution is warranted —

Recent claims have been made in court by plaintiffs that asserted that tele-commuting was justified for an organization to offer reasonable accommodations as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act, i.e. Bixby v. JPMorgan Chase; Core v. Champaign County Board of County Commissioners; and EEOC v. Ford Motor Co.

As such, do not leave the decision to allow a tele-commuting arrangement to be established at the local manager level.  This approach will result in different managers having different policies and may create a liability for the company.  Establish one policy and ensure that all follow it.  Seek the input of an employment attorney.

Where is your company in this process?

Author: Regis Quirin
Visit Regis's Website - Email Regis
Regis Quirin is a financial executive with 23 years of corporate experience, i.e. New York Stock Exchange, JP Morgan Chase, and GMAC ResCap; and 15 years working with small and medium-sized entities, i.e. joint ventures, start-up entities, established businesses. In 2014, Regis published "Redesign to Turnaround Underperforming Small and Medium-Sized Businesses" available via Amazon.

2013 Year End Tax Strategy

With four months remaining in the year, a sound approach would be to review expiring business tax provisions and plan accordingly.  Are there tax benefits today that you would like to take advantage of before the opportunity passes?

According to the Joint Committee on Taxation, List of Expiring Federal Tax Provision 2013-2023 (01.11.2013), there are 55 provisions that will expire, of which 24 would be categorized as business provisions.  While many of these provisions have been extended previously; it is unlikely they will be extended again, based on the current tax policy environment.

Are there activities that you are considering implementing in 2014 that if you moved to 2013 would allow you to take advantage of tax benefits?  Some of the more general provisions include –

15-year straight-line cost recovery for qualified leasehold improvements, qualified restaurant buildings and improvements, and qualified retail improvements (secs. 168(e)(3)(E)(iv), (v),(ix), 168(e)(7)(A)(i) and (e)(8)) – In 2014, the straight-line recovery period will revert back to 39-years.

Increase in expensing to $500,000/$2,000,000 and expansion of definition of section 179 property (secs. 179(b)(1) and (2) and 179(f)) – In 2014, deduction and qualifying property limits will be $25,000 and $200,000, respectively.  Additionally, off-the shelf computer software qualifies for Section 179 expensing in 2013, but not in 2014.

Tax credit for research and experimentation expenses (sec. 41(h)(1)(B))

To understand what expiring provisions will impact your specific situation, it is recommended that you consult with your tax advisor.

To review the full listing of expring provisions, please see – https://www.jct.gov/publications.html?func=startdown&id=4499

Author: Regis Quirin
Visit Regis's Website - Email Regis
Regis Quirin is a financial executive with 23 years of corporate experience, i.e. New York Stock Exchange, JP Morgan Chase, and GMAC ResCap; and 15 years working with small and medium-sized entities, i.e. joint ventures, start-up entities, established businesses. In 2014, Regis published "Redesign to Turnaround Underperforming Small and Medium-Sized Businesses" available via Amazon.